Forefoot Pain

The medical term for pain in the forefoot is “Metatarsalgia”.

Causes can include:

  • Wearing unsupportive footwear

  • Conditions such as arthritis

  • High impact sports

Symptoms can be described as:

  • A burning or aching sensation

  • A shooting pain

  • Tingling or numbness in the toes

  • The feeling of a small stone stuck under the foot

When should I see a podiatrist?

  • If the pain doesn’t improve after trying self-help measures

  • The pain is interfering significantly with everyday activities

  • You experience severe or sudden foot pain or a change in your foot shape (this could indicate a serious problem that requires immediate attention)

Treatments may include:

 

Heel Pain

There are many different causes for heel pain.

Causes can include:

  • Plantar fasciitis

  • Heel bursitis

  • Heel bumps

  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome

  • Chronic inflammation of the heel pad

  • Stress fracture

  • Severs disease

  • Achilles tendonosis

 

Symptoms:

  • Heel pain is usually felt either under the heel or just behind it

  • Pain typically starts gradually, with no injury to the affected area. It is often triggered by wearing a flat shoe

  • In most cases the pain is under the foot, towards the front heel

  • Pain can be severe if caused by an injury. At the time of the injury the person may have noticed a popping sound.

  • Symptoms may be worse first thing in the morning just after getting out of bed then improve as the day goes on. The pain may then worsen towards the end of the day.

When should I see a podiatrist?

  • If the pain doesn’t improve after trying self-help measures

  • The pain is interfering significantly with everyday activities

  • The pain has persisted for more than 2 weeks

 

Treatments may include:

  • Recommendations from the podiatrist regarding specific exercises and footwear

  • Orthoses (insoles)

  • Steroid injections

  • Surgery (in severe cases where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful)

 

Shin Pain

Shin pain is often referred to as shin splints or medial tibial stress syndrome.

 

Causes:

  • Repetitive activity that causes stress to the shine bone and connective tissues that attach the muscle to the bone

  • Foot and ankle over-pronation

 

Symptoms can be described as:

  • Pain and tenderness along the tibia (shin bone) during exercise

  • Potential swelling of the lower legs

  • In chronic cases there may be lumps and bumps along the bone

  • In severe cases there may be red patches on the skin around the painful areas

  • Initially, pain will stop after exercise but as the condition worsens may become constant

When should I see a podiatrist?

  • If the pain doesn’t improve after trying self-help measures

 

Treatments may include: